Wednesday, 28 May 2014

Anti-spam complaints may sometimes be ignored, CRTC says


hi-spam

A new law designed to help unclog Canadians' email inboxes takes effect July 1, but the CRTC is warning that it won't be able to respond to every complaint it receives.

The new federal anti-spam legislation requires that businesses get written or oral consent before they send emails or other digital messages to consumers. Companies must also clearly identify themselves in each message and allow consumers to unsubscribe from digital mailings.

"We were pleased (with the drafted legislation) because we thought (the government) had, after many years, grasped that the fundamental problem with all unsolicited marketing — and email is no exception — is that unless you ask for it, you probably don't want it," says John Lawford, executive director of the Public Interest Advocacy Centre.

But internet users may actually receive an influx of commercial emails in the lead-up to July 1.
While companies have a three-year grace period to confirm consent with consumers they had previously signed up for mailing lists, many are racing to do so by the end of June.

Some businesses are concerned that the methods they had used to populate their existing mailing lists may not be fully compliant with the new rules.

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